Events Calendar

Current Weather

Manatee Road Watch


Eat Here - Gulf Coast Cookery Sean Tampa Bay yacht Management Bills Discount Center - New & used Furnature, Appliances and More!

The Bradenton Times Polls

Poll Question: Do you agree with the U.S. government's move to normalize relations with Cuba?

 Yes  No More polls »



Home
Change Text Size: Larger  Smaller

News Section: Politics



The State of Gov. Scott’s State:

“We Inherited a Terrible Mess” ... Government is Bad, Spending is Worse and Children are the Future ... "Let's keep working."

Published Wednesday, March 5, 2014 7:30 am

On Tuesday, Republican Gov. Rick Scott delivered his 4th State of the State address and kicked off the 116th Regular Session of the Florida Legislature. In his speech, the first-term governor focused more on what the state has been than where it is going.

 

This being an election year, it was not surprising to see Scott perform like he was out stumping on the campaign trail—peppering each point with a human interest story and blowing his own horn, while getting in a lot of early jabs at former Gov. Charlie Crist, the Republican-turned-independent-turned-Democrat who will run against Scott this November.

 

At one point he even said, “we inherited a terrible mess.”

 

In fact, Governor Scott couldn’t have pointed his finger any more blatantly without naming his competition outright. And who could blame him? After all, President Obama did the same thing in his State of the Union pitch last month. 

 

The governor went in early, mentioning 460,000 new private-sector jobs created in Florida since he took office in 2011, and really picked up speed after introducing his family—which included a new grandson and eldest grandson who, according to the governor, wants to be either a cowboy or a fork-lift operator when he grows up. 

 

Gov. Scott said, “My hope is that Florida will be the place where he can make his dreams come true—whatever they are. But, that’s not where our state was headed a few years ago. Like Washington, Florida’s economy was driven into the ground by spending what some embraced as ‘free money’—Of course, there is no such thing.”

 

The message was clear: Charlie Crist bankrupted your lives by carelessly spending all of your hard-earned money. 

 

Gov. Scott said that in 2010, when Crist was on his way out, debt was over $28 billion and unemployment higher than 11 percent. He went down a list of his own administration’s accomplishments, which included paying down $3.6 billion of the state’s debt and reducing unemployment by 5.3 percent, as well as paying back $3.5 billion that the state borrowed from the federal government for unemployment assistance. 

 

“Unlike the previous administration,” he said, “which lost 1 million jobs—We have added almost a half a million jobs. We have cut taxes 24-times already, and my hope is that we are about to cut them again by another $500 million this year.” 

 

Gov. Scott hopes to get those cuts in before the end of 2014 because he might be out of office next year. 

 

Education was another big topic on the governor’s stump. He pledged to pump $18.8 billion into Florida’s K-12 education system, and after mentioning his ongoing effort to give full-time public classroom teachers a state-wide pay raise, Gov. Scott said that the investment would pay off because Florida teachers are ranked among the most effective in the nation. 

 

“Because of their hard work, our fourth and eighth graders have had the largest achievement gains in the nation," claimed Scott. "Our fourth graders are now second in the world for reading, and Florida high schools are 4 out of the top 10 in the country.”

 

The governor went on to say that his administration is recommending $80 million for colleges and universities that graduate students positioned to actually find a job. To make college more affordable, he said they want to cut the 15 percent annual increase and inflationary increase on tuition. The governor also mentioned his successful initiative to make workforce-oriented bachelor’s degrees available for only $10,000 from all of Florida’s 4-year state colleges. 

 

Before going into a series of heartwarming and All-American human-interest stories that ended with a nod to the troops, Gov. Scott hit on jobs-creation and tax cuts again. He said that if the state continues to pay down its debt and cut taxes—especially taxes on small businesses—that Florida will become “not just the land of 700,000 new jobs,” but The Land of Opportunity.  

 

“Government cannot create jobs,” he said. “Washington has proven that. But, government can create an environment where Floridians can create jobs.”

 

He ended with a sort of prayer of the faithful—repeating, at the start of each petition, the chorus "Let's keep working," which will no doubt become a battle cry during his campaign for re-election. 

 

"Let’s keep working

To reject the tax-borrow-and-spend approach of D.C.

 

...We have more work left to do; so let’s keep working."

 

* * * * * 

 

Democratic leader in the Florida House of Representatives Perry Thurston issued the following response to Gov. Scott’s State of the State address—

 

Hello. I’m Perry Thurston, the Democratic leader in the House of Representatives.

 

Today, the 116th Regular Session of the Florida Legislature gets underway with Governor Rick Scott and Republicans still in charge of your state government.

 

Democrats are committed to working with the governor and Republican leaders where we can. But we believe that after 16 years of Republican control, their strategies are failing to meet the needs of working families and are favoring wealthy special interests.

 

As Democratic leaders, we have our own views on how best to move Florida forward, and it starts with the desire for an effective and efficient government that works for the middle class.

 

So rather than addressing the shortcomings of Governor Scott’s remarks today, I want to share with you an alternative vision: one that is based in Democratic Party values of good public schools, affordable health coverage, and economic prosperity for all Floridians.

 

One of the most important issues of this session will be the plight of our state’s workforce.

 

Right now, there’s a bill in the United States Congress to raise the nation’s minimum wage. But when it comes to our workers, we need not wait for Congress to act.

 

In Florida, we have a state minimum wage of seven dollars and nine-three cents an hour that should be increased because raising Floridians’ wages is good for business and good for our economy.

 

Doing so reduces turnover. It boosts productivity, and it gives folks more money to spend at local businesses.

 

That’s why I support Democratic-sponsored legislation this year that would raise Florida’s minimum wage to a livable earning of at least ten dollars and ten cents an hour.

 

And when it comes to pocketbook issues, I’m happy to remind you that House Democratic Caucus members have, for several years now, unanimously opposed fee hikes on drivers’ licenses and automobile registrations. But unlike Governor Scott, we didn’t think the idea of repealing those consumer costs should have to wait until an election year like this one.

 

But we all know the best way to create jobs and secure a strong economy is to invest in our future.

 

We need to educate our children and increase the success of our public schools. We also need to make sure that Floridians have health insurance. And we must allow for the health coverage expansion using available federal dollars.

 

We’ve got to do better. And we certainly have to do better than what occurred when Governor Scott took office.

 


We need new leadership in the Legislature, the Governor’s Mansion, and in the attorney general’s office and other Cabinet posts.

 

Governor Scott and the Republican-run Legislature slashed more than one-billion dollars in funding from Florida’s schools. They’ve also made cuts to Bright Futures Scholarships that students need to attain a college education.

 

Frankly, on no issue are Democrats and Republicans in the Legislature more divergent than in our approach to education.

 

Democrats believe that a solid public education is the best economic investment we can make. Unfortunately, Rick Scott’s election-year promises aren’t in keeping with the way he’s governed. He’s attacked teachers and raided public school funding.

 

I think we can do even more for our students, and early learning through a stronger Pre-Kindergarten program, would help. It’s also time to look at Common Core standards. While Democrats have no major objection to the standards themselves, we are concerned about their implementation.

 

Our students are our most valuable asset. We can’t afford to get this wrong. We must create some time before these new standards are used in the testing of and evaluation of our teachers and schools.

 

But on no issue do people matter more than Medicaid expansion. Millions of dollars are being lost and Governor Scott’s administration is no closer to a solution for the thousands of Floridians waiting on their chance at quality, affordable health care coverage.

 

I hold responsible --- and I think you should too --- the Republican legislative leaders and Governor Rick Scott for this moral and mathematical failure of our state.

 

Every day we wait to expand health coverage is another day Florida loses millions of federal dollars --- not to deficit reduction, as some would have you believe, but to other states that have expanded their Medicaid program.

 

We can’t wait any longer. It’s time to expand health coverage for Floridians now.

 

So, let me put into a nutshell what Democrats in the House of Representatives stand for.

 

We’re for putting children and education first.
Investing in jobs and innovation for Floridians.
Protecting our land and water. 
Promoting public safety and health, as well as our state’s great diversity and workforce.

 

These are top priorities of the Florida House Democratic Caucus. And I am happy to invite all Floridians --- Republicans, Democrats, Independents and others --- to join us in these priorities.

 

Again, I’m House Democratic Leader Perry Thurston. Thank you.

Join the conversation post Facebook comments here or on our site at the bottom of article.

 

  In Addition to Facebook Comments You Can Also Post Comments Below



Non-Facebook Comments:

Click here to add a Non-Facebook comment to this page




 Sign up for our free news subscription - a great way to stay informed!



News World Round UpSports Roundup

Manatee Rural Health Certificate
 

MidTown Manatee - Shop here - Work here - Play Here - Live Here - Worship Here - Dine Here

Obituaries

Name Date
Frederick Baas December 17, 2014
Wanda Pooley December 15, 2014
Agnes Haynes December 15, 2014
Thelma Mathis December 14, 2014
Robert Cooper December 9, 2014
Sarah Robinson December 12, 2014
Harry Wujcik December 13, 2014
Annie McNally December 12, 2014
Pritamdas Chatani December 11, 2014
All Obituaries






Copyright © 2009 - 2014 | The Bradenton Times | More than just an Online Newspaper | http://www.thebradentontimes.com/
405 26 Avenue Bradenton, FL 34205
Phone: 941-896-7857 - Privacy Policy - RSS Feed
Template provided by Free CSS Templates