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News Section: Business and Financial



It's December 31: Do You Know Where Your Money Is?

Published Saturday, December 28, 2013 12:04 am

Prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. Copyright 2013 for use by Evan R. Guido

 

If you're entitled to a distribution from your 401(k) plan (for example, because you've left your job, or you've reached age 59½), and it's rollover-eligible, you may be faced with a choice. Should you take the distribution and roll the funds over to an IRA, or should you leave your money where it is?

December and January are the perfect months to look back at what you earned, saved, and spent during the past year, as W-2s, account statements, and other year-end financial summaries roll in. So before Punxsutawney Phil comes out of his burrow to predict when spring is coming, take some time to get your financial house in order.

How much have you saved?

Whether you simply resolved last year to save more or you set a specific financial goal (for example, saving 15% of your income for retirement), it's time to find out how you did. Start by taking a look at your account balances. How much did you save for college or retirement? Were you able to increase your emergency fund? If you were saving for a large purchase, did you save as much as you expected? Challenge yourself in the new year to save a little bit more so that you can make steady financial progress.

How did your investments perform?

Review any investment statements you've received. How have your investments performed in comparison to general market conditions, against industry benchmarks, and in relationship to your expectations and needs? Do you need to make any adjustments based on your own circumstances, your tolerance for risk, or because of market conditions?

Did you reduce debt?

Tracking your spending is just as important as tracking your savings, but it's hard to do when you're caught up in an endless cycle of paying down your debt and then borrowing more money, over and over again. Fortunately, end of year mortgage statements, credit card statements, and vehicle financing statements will all spell out the amount of debt you still owe and how much you've really been able to pay off. You may even find that you're making more progress than you think. Keep these statements so that you have an easy way to track your progress next year.

Where did your employment taxes go?

If you're covered by Social Security, the W-2 you receive from your employer by the end of January will show how much you paid into the Social Security system via payroll taxes collected. If you're self-employed, you report and pay these taxes (called self-employment taxes) yourself. These taxes help fund future Social Security benefits, but many people have no idea what they can expect to receive from Social Security in the future. This year, get in the habit of checking your Social Security statement annually to find out how much you've been contributing to the Social Security system and what future benefits you might expect, based on current law. To access your statement, sign up for a mySocialSecurity account at the Social Security Administration's website, www.socialsecurity.gov.

Has your financial outlook changed during the past year?

Once you've reviewed your account balances and financial statements, your next step is to look at your whole financial picture. Taking into account your income, your savings and investments, and your debt load, did your finances improve over the course of the year? If not, why not?

Then it's time to think about the changes you would like to make for next year. Start by considering the following questions:

  • What are your greatest financial concerns?
  • Do you need help or advice in certain areas?
  • Are your financial goals the same as they were last year?
  • Do you need to revise your budget now that you've reviewed what you've earned, saved, and spent?

Using what you've learned about your finances--good and bad--to set your course for next year can help you ensure that your financial position in the new year is stronger than ever.

Got Questions? Ask Guido

 

 

Evan R. Guido

Vice President of Private Wealth Management

One Sarasota Tower, Suite 1200

Two North Tamiami Trail

Sarasota, FL  34236-4702

941-906-2829 Direct Line

888 366-6603 Toll Free

941 366-6193 Fax

www.EVANGUIDO.com

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